Dog owners beware Alabama rot warning.

Dog owners have been warned to keep their beloved pets away from mud after fears the killer disease, Alabama Rot, could be picked up from it.

Alabama Rot also known as CRGV is a deadly illness which has attacked many canine companions.

The crippling disease causes the dog to vomit and develop skin lesions and in 80 per cent of cases death.

 

Vets have urged pet owners to thoroughly clean their pets after walking in mud amid fears the disease could be contracted from it.

WARNING SIGNS OF ALABAMA ROT

  • Pet owners should check their dogs for lesions and ulcers
  • The lesions may appear on the dogs’ skin and paws which can be a sign of the killer disease
  • The dogs may also develop sore, open wounds
  • Over the next two to ten days dogs will develop clinical signs of kidney failure
  • Dogs may begin to vomit, have a reduced appetite and tiredness
  • Pet owners who see these symptoms in their pets should contact a vet immediately
  • There is currently no known way of preventing a dog from catching the disease

Official advice from the Dogs Trust said: ‘Where possible, stick to dry paths and keep dogs out of muddy or wet areas.

‘Wash off any mud after your walk so you can check for any lesions or wounds and if you spot any, go to your vet.’

Despite the warning, the exact cause behind the horrendous disease is still unknown.

Dubbed by vets as the ‘dog’s black death’, once Alabama Rot strikes it is often already too late.

Around 135 cases have been recorded since 2012 but some fear the bad weather experienced this winter could make 2018 the worst year yet.

The illness is believed to thrive in cold, wet soil, as around 60% of the cases occur in the first three months of the year.

Last year, the highest number of deaths were recorded at 37, but in 2018 there have already been 29 confirmed cases.

 Dubbed by vets as the 'dog's black death', once Alabama Rot strikes it is often already too late, with 70 to 80 percent of all cases being fatal and no known effective treatment

 Dubbed by vets as the ‘dog’s black death’, once Alabama Rot strikes it is often already too late, with 70 to 80 percent of all cases being fatal and no known effective treatment

What is Alabama rot and what do the experts say?

Alabama rot, or cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy, originated in America among Greyhounds in the 1980s but UK cases have only been reported since the end of 2012.

The disease does not seem to target any specific breed, age, sex or weight of dog and cases have been reported in locations across the UK.

Analysis of the numbers indicates dogs are most prone to the disease between October and June.

If caught early then treatment can be applied to the dog’s kidneys but in four out of five cases help arrives too late.

Concerned dog owners are advised to look out for skin sores or swelling on the dog’s legs, which could be signs of Alabama rot.

Animal Health Trust spokeswoman Farrah Owens said: ‘The best thing dog owners can do is be aware of the symptoms and access their vets as soon as they see signs of sickness, diarrhoea and lethargy. Dogs that visit their vet quickly tend to recover.’

A Forestry Commission spokesman said: ‘Owners should always keep their dogs under close control and be aware of anything they may pick up, chew or eat in a woodland area.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5542005/Pet-owners-warned-dogs-away-MUD-amid-fears-pick-killer-Alabama-rot.html#ixzz5AnGVQIrK
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